© The Author 2013; all rights reserved.Background Results from some retrospective studies suggest a possible increased risk of glioma and acoustic neuroma in users of mobile phones. Methods The relation between mobile phone use and incidence of intracranial central nervous system (CNS) tumours and other cancers was examined in 791 710 middle-aged women in a UK prospective cohort, the Million Women Study. Cox regression models were used to estimate adjusted relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Women reported mobile phone use in 1999 to 2005 and again in 2009. Results During 7 years' follow-up, 51 680 incident invasive cancers and 1 261 incident intracranial CNS tumours occurred. Risk among ever vs never users of mobile phones was not increased for all intracranial CNS tumours (RR=1.01, 95% CI=0.90-1.14, P=0.82), for specified CNS tumour types nor for cancer at 18 other specified sites. For longterm users compared with never users, there was no appreciable association for glioma (10+ years: RR=0.78, 95% CI=0.55-1.10, P=0.16) or meningioma (10+ years: RR=1.10, 95% CI=0.66-1.84, P=0.71). For acoustic neuroma, there was an increase in risk with long term use vs never use (10+ years: RR=2.46, 95% CI=1.07- 5.64, P=0.03), the risk increasing with duration of use (trend among users, P=0.03). Conclusions In this large prospective study, mobile phone use was not associated with increased incidence of glioma, meningioma or non-CNS cancers.

Original publication




Journal article


Journal of Immunology

Publication Date





792 - 802